Politics & Society

From Spring ’11: On mere suspicion

We’ve just posted an online version from our Spring 2011 issue of Christopher Michaelsen’s critique of the United Nations Security Council’s sanctions regime, which has been used to target individuals and groups alleged by one or more states to be

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Journalism with a cause

In part driving, and in part driven by, the still unfolding and highly contested “Arab Spring” is the equally remarkable transformation of Arab media culture, as many television broadcasters and newspapers in the region attempt to pull away from what

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From republic to reconciliation

In most states the concept of land ownership is a multi-layered one. Private citizens or corporations may own a property outright, though governments may typically expropriate such property for public purposes if the owner is compensated fairly. Governments may (or

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After Fukushima, India takes stock

225 million years ago the Indian subcontinent was an island off Australia; the inexorable movement of tectonic plates since that time has smashed it (slowly) into Asia, the crumpling from which collision created the 2900-kilometer Himalayan mountain range. Tectonics has

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More important than a better shell

Alaskan journalist (and contributor to SCOPE‘s inaugural issue) Charles Wohlforth’s most recent book, The Fate of Nature, is now out in paperback. An extended and deeply thoughtful reflection on human nature and on our collective ability to solve our global

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From macro to metro

Projections show that 75% of the world’s population will be living in cities in the next couple of decades: right now, 40 people per hour are moving into the city of Lagos, Nigeria. This unprecedentedly urbanized world will bring both

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Cosmopolitanism and the duty to assist

A January 31 podcast interview with Oxford political and moral philosopher Cécile Fabre has turned out to be rather timely, concerning as it does the question of how the cosmopolitan concern for individuals, whoever they are and wherever they might

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Crucial overflow

On June 13 of last year, Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa (“peregrine falcon”) successfully completed its seven-year mission by returning to Earth samples from asteroid 25143 Itokawa. In a recent interview with monthly Japanese literary magazine Chūōkōron (translated by Japan Echo), mission

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A path from the madrassa

Najeeb Jung, vice chancellor of Jamia Millia Islamia, India’s national Islamic university, writes in The Times of India on the important role played by this institution in the lives of young Muslims, and in the country at large; after more

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Throwing money at the problem might work

Whether you lean to the left or to the right, careful planning of the delivery of social services is essential to a country’s development. These programs, large and small, require a strong administrative support system to ensure that services reach

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The iconography of war and terror

In this media and advertising-saturated age, the power of images is hardly a point of debate. At their most banal, they grab our attention to make a sale; at their most elevated, they hold us spellbound in an art gallery.

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The Devil finds work for idle hands

One of the most interesting ways to pass an hour or two is to visit the National Security Archive site, hosted by George Washington University, which collects and posts declassified U.S. government documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act,

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