Film

Sovereigns, not settlers

In ethnically-diverse North America, there can be a fine line between a natural melding of cultures and cultural appropriation — a now-familiar battle cry that rings out each time Iggy Azalea releases a new track. But when people accuse one another of appropriating aspects of Indigenous culture in particular, argues Monika Siebert, they’re often missing a more important political point.

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Those marvellous magical spinning machines

In this age of stunningly-complex digital animations, in which computer technology seemingly removes all limits for artists, it is refreshing and inspiring to see how the physical constraints of pottery, drawing, and paper cut-outs can be transformed into a new kind of magic.

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Full speed

Moscow-born-New York-based photographer and international model Ira Chernova talks with SCOPE about being on both sides of the camera, her attraction to fairy tales, and the importance of shooting in the moment. (Photo: Alina Valitova)

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Into the great wide open

Today’s children spend less time in nature than any generation before them. Jon Alexander, brand strategist at the UK’s National Trust, and filmmaker David Bond tell SCOPE about the implications for children’s well-being, and about their ambitious (and irreverent) Project Wild Thing, a documentary that looks at what it would take to get boys and girls back outside.

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Dying here is forbidden

“The lady doth protest too much, methinks,” Queen Gertrude dryly observes to her son Hamlet after watching a play he has staged about the murder of a king and the remarriage of his wife — a play meant to echo

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A bicycle would cost more… and would be far less fun to watch

Beginning a fifty-theatre run in France this week is a two-hour-and-thirteen-minute film that has attracted a great deal of critical buzz and was recently featured in the ACID lineup at Cannes. Praised for its realism and intensity, another part of

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The other civil war

Applied to film, the phrase “a civil war romance” immediately conjures up images of Gone with the Wind, so I was pleasantly surprised — then delighted — to realize that in the case of The Princess of Montpensier, the civil

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The before and the after of violence

Guest post by Abby Plener The question of how to represent violence in art is a compelling one. For directors like Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez, the power of cinema lies in its ability to portray violence unapologetically, to capture

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Pas de deux

I’m not personally an immense fan of serial killer movies–much less of revenge films in the same genre–but Steve Dollar’s review of Kim Ji-woon’s new thriller, I Saw the Devil, has me intrigued. And if its trailer is anything to

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I can see why you can’t hear me now

A team from the Oslo School of Architecture and Design has developed an intriguing approach to measuring and understanding the effectiveness of a WiFi network: a 4-metre rod with 80 lights along its length shows the signal strength at any

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Ties that separate

Guest post by Abby Plener In 1979, the Iranian Revolution overthrew the the Pahlavi dynasty with remarkable force. Much of its strength derived from the diversity it managed to mobilize: the movement appealed to secular nationalists, middle-class liberals, proclaimed Marxists,

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Authors of our fates — or just characters?

The philosopher Alain de Botton once argued in a 2009 TED presentation that the meritocratic ideals that are such a point of pride in our modern age have a dark side. In explicitly accepting the idea that people are rewarded

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