Archive

How novelists write novels — and survive

Funny and incisive, The Awl blog — whose aspirational tag line is “Be less stupid.” — has inaugurated what will be a series of posts on the topic of how writers write, and how they live while writing, and (in

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Staying in touch with SCOPE

Just a quick FYI to let you all know that we’ve polished up our “staying in touch” links in the right-hand column of our front page: Facebook, Twitter, and RSS are now easy to spot by their famous icons, so

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“Google it” today, but “experience it” tomorrow

Ian Garrick Mason: I’d like to introduce Erin Bury, who will be contributing to the SCOPE Magazine blog by discovering and presenting start-up companies from around the world who are basing their businesses on great new ideas. Erin is the

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The invisible geometry of our urban lives

Christoph Gielen’s photographs are simple at first glance, merely aerial shots of built-up areas, the kind of view one gets 30 seconds after take-off in an airplane as it banks over a city. Yet looked at more carefully, they become

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Pearls from a Darwinian sea

Darwin enthusiasts, fans of the history of science, and retired secret policemen will all enjoy rifling through the treasures of the Darwin Correspondence Project, which was first set up in 1974 by science historian the late Frederick Burkhardt as an

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Breaking cars and communities

There are glimpses of mankind’s relationship with cast-off objects that stick with you. The salvage and re-use of coral-cinder blocks from abandoned buildings in Barbados; the breaking of mammoth ships into scrap metal on the Alang beaches of India. Though

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Charity rising

According to an article in a recent issue of the South China Morning Post‘s Net Worth magazine, philanthropy — a very public philanthropy at that — is on the rise among the wealthy business elites of mainland China. This is

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From polarization to universal respect

Great attention is currently being paid to the literary skills and political influence of Mario Vargas Llosa, winner of this year’s Nobel Prize for Literature. The Economist‘s Prospero blog is so effusive as to make him seem a Peruvian (if

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Beyond the base of the pyramid

There is by now an extensive and growing literature about how to do business profitably at “the base of the pyramid” — which is to say, among low-income consumers in developing markets. But a new article published in California Management

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Tiny perfect Post-it art

The man’s art is eerie, even a little horrifying, yet funny and warm and familial at the same time. His monsters often come in gangs, are frequently of Brobdingnagian size, and are typically found creeping up on unsuspecting children. His

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White citadels, with filter tips

If you were wondering about where the 6 trillion cigarettes that are made each year come from — and the answers “cigarette companies” or “consumer demand” are just too vague for you — you’ll be pleased to hear about “Cigarette

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Black metal and two-number disasters

The genre of rock music known as “metal” has gone through some interesting evolutionary changes over the past forty years; the original “heavy metal” of Led Zeppelin and Judas Priest now sounding positively tuneful and, well, almost light in comparison

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